Posted in Book Review, Grades 3-5, Realistic Fiction, Sunshine State 2018-19

Lemons – audiobook

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Lemons - Melissa Savage

Bigfoot.

It’s the very first thing I see when we pull into town.

opening lines

This is a charming story about a feisty 9 year-old girl (Lemonade Liberty Witt) who is forced to uproot her life to live with her grandfather (who she never even met) when her mom passes away. Willow Creek is the Bigfoot Capital of the world and Lem’s neighbor, 11-year old Tobin Sky, is the CEO of Bigfoot Detectives, Inc. Together, Lem and Tobin follow Bigfoot leads and try to capture him on film.

This is a realistic story set in the 1970’s that deals with some pretty serious issues surrounding grief and loss. Lem is grieving the loss of her mother and Tobin is dealing with his father’s disappearance after coming back from Vietnam. Tobin and Lem are cute together and their interactions bring humor to what is a pretty serious theme. The additional plot line with Tobin’s father is a little overwhelming and his issues with PTSD may be hard for children to understand. The end of the book is a bit surprising considering how realistic the rest of the book is, but overall this is a touching story of friendship, loss, and dealing with grief.

Recommended to: Grades 4-6, fans of realistic fiction who can deal with a bit of sadness

 

Original post:
readingismyescape.booklikes.com/post/1770041/lemons-audiobook

Posted in Book Review, Grades 3-5, Realistic Fiction, Sunshine State 2018-19

Spirit Week Showdown – audiobook

Review: owlowlowl

Spirit Week Showdown (Magnificent Mya Tibbs) - Eda Kaban, Crystal Allen, Sisi Aisha Johnson

I’m only wearing five braids to school today.

– First Sentence

Mya is excited for Spirit Week and she is counting down the days with her braids. When she gets to one, it will be time for Spirit Week. But the partner picking doesn’t go her way and she ends up with Mean Connie Tate (the school bully) for a partner instead of her best friend Naomi.

As Mya would say, “good gravy.” And she says that often as she tries to navigate friendships, bullies, and Spirit Week challenges. Mya learns a lot about people and about judging others by what you hear about them. She is a perky little girl and easy to like, even though she doesn’t always think things through before she acts. Mya is a strong personality, but she desperately wants to repair her friendship with Naomi – even though Mya didn’t really do anything wrong. The flavor of Texas really comes through in the writing. In the audiobook, the narrator does a fantastic job of sounding like a Texas girl with attitude.

I think grownups reading this book will easily recognize the characters for who they are, but kids might be a bit surprised by the ending. The story is engaging and certainly humorous at times. You can’t help but laugh about some of the phrases that Mya comes out with. Girls will enjoy this one.

Recommended to: 3rd-5th graders who like stories about friendship and triumphing over adversity.

 

Original post:
readingismyescape.booklikes.com/post/1765727/spirit-week-showdown-audiobook

Posted in Book Review, Grades 3-5, Realistic Fiction, Sunshine State 2018-19

The Great Treehouse War by Lisa Graff

Review:

owlowlowlowl half

There are a lot of things you should probably know to understand why a bunch of kids decided to climb up a treehouse and not come down.

– First Line

Imagine a never-ending sleepover in a treehouse with 9 of your best friends. Just so you know, the treehouse has a bathroom (but no stove), two floors, a craft station, a platform for deliveries, a skylight, and a zipline. The thing is, the kids are staying in the treehouse and refusing to come down until their parents give in to their demands. While a treehouse sleepover sounds amazing (and who wants sleepovers to end), 10 kids in close quarters can become stressful for even the best of friends.

Winnie originally stays in the treehouse every Wednesday – so her divorcing parents can have equal numbers of days with her. When Winnie realizes she is failing 5th grade and the only time she gets any homework done is Wednesdays in the treehouse, she decides to stay there permanently. But, will her parents ever see reason and stop fighting over everything being exactly equal??

The plot touches on issues like divorce, screen time, tv privileges, and other difficulties between parents and children.  It’s an engaging story with realistic characters who love and support each other through everything. The format is a group memoir (written by Winnie) and there are cute illustrations and post-its from the other characters throughout the book.

Kids will love the idea of living in a treehouse with their friends and not having to answer to parents. (There is a plot point that prevents the parents or police from entering the treehouse which verges on ridiculous, but the kids won’t mind.)

Recommended to: Grades 3 – 8, fans of realistic fiction, and reluctant readers. Fans of James Patterson’s Middle School series will enjoy this one. 🙂

 

Original post:
readingismyescape.booklikes.com/post/1664143/the-great-treehouse-war-by-lisa-graff

Posted in Book Review, Grades 3-5, Graphic Novel

Brave by Svetlana Chmakova

Review:

owlowlowlowl half

Brave is the sequel to Awkwardan amazing graphic novel about navigating middle school life. Brave follows the same basic group of kids, with a different main character. In Brave, Jensen (the art club kid from Awkward who is obsessed with sunspots) learns about bullying. He doesn’t think he is a victim at first, but he gradually begins to understand what being bullied really means. He compares his school day to a video game, a constant struggle to avoid the “bad guys” and traps; making it through the day is a struggle for “survival.”

This book has a bit more mature content compared with Awkward. There is no sex or serious violence, but the bullies call Jensen “fatso” and “stupid” and Jensen uses the phrase “makes my life a living hell.” Compared to the overall message in this book, these are tiny considerations. But, as a parent, you should know what you are getting into. Many of our 3rd graders read Awkward and their parents might not think they are ready for this one.

Overall, this is a great book that describes realities of middle school, bullying, feeling alone, making friends, and standing up for yourself. I highly recommend it to 4th grade and up.

 

Original post:
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Posted in Grades 3-5, Graphic Novel, Realistic Fiction

Awkward by Svetlana Chmakova

Review:

owlowlowlowl

 

Cardinal rule #1 for surviving school: Don’t get noticed by the mean kids.

Cardinal rule #2 for surviving school: Seek out groups with similar interests and join them.

Penelope Torres (Peppi) is thinking of these rules as she starts a new school. When a boy (Jaime) tries to help her pick up all her stuff, the mean kids start calling her Nerder Girlfriend. Embarrassed, Peppi pushes Jaime and runs away. She feels guilty and spends most of her time trying to figure out how to apologize. When a rivalry heats up between Peppi’s art club and Jaime’s science club, things become even more awkward.

This is a charming middle school story that kids will enjoy. It is age appropriate for 3rd grade and up – no violence or bad words – just a sweet story with a hopeful ending. The graphics are expressive and fun, a highly recommended graphic novel.

 

Original post:
readingismyescape.booklikes.com/post/1644335/awkward-by-svetlana-chmakova

Posted in Book Review, Grades 3-5, Realistic Fiction, Sunshine State 16-17

Sweet Realistic Fiction Story

book_prairie

 

Prairie Evers by Ellen Airgood

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This is a sweet story about a young girl whose family moves from North Carolina to New York state. She has been home-schooled for her whole life so far and when her parents decide she should go to school, she is scared. She doesn’t want to go. She dreads the bus, the other students, sitting in school all day… But, she finds something at school that she never had before… a best friend.

Young girls will love this sweet story about friendship, dealing with change, and discovering who you are.

Recommended to:

Grades 3 – 5, fans of realistic fiction.