Posted in Adult, Adventure, Audiobook

Lost Boy by Christina Henry

Review:

owlowlowlowl

There is one version of my story that everyone knows. And then there is the truth. Once I loved a boy called Peter Pan. Peter brought me to his island because there were no rules and no grownups to make us mind. He brought boys from the Other Place to join in the fun, but Peter’s idea of fun is sharper than a pirate’s sword. He wants always to be that shining sun that we all revolve around. He’ll do anything to be that sun. Peter promised we would all be young and happy forever. Peter will say I’m a villain, that I wronged him, that I never was his friend. Peter Lies.

What if you heard the story from another character’s point of view? Would it change who you thought of as the hero??

If the story was anything like this, then I would say yes. This is the true story of Captain Hook. In this version, Peter is a trickster with no conscience who only cares about staying young, having fun, and getting what he wants. Before he became Captain Hook, Jamie was a strong, determined young boy, even though he was more than a bit naive.

Peter brought Jamie to the island so they could stay young forever, together. And no one had better stand in the way of Peter getting his way. Is Peter magic? Is it the island? And what will happen when Jamie finally figures out the truth?

OK, so we all know the end, but we don’t know how they get there. And that is where this story hooks you.

It is bloody, violent, sad, chilling, and even sentimental at times. I loved the narration. Samuel Roukin (British accent and all) set the scene and had me immersed in the world of the lost boys.

Highly recommended – if you don’t mind violence. The concept of “never growing up” isn’t as appealing as it once was…

It’s not such a wonderful thing

To be young.

It’s heartless and selfish.

– Jamie

 

Original post:
readingismyescape.booklikes.com/post/1658217/lost-boy-by-christina-henry

Posted in Adult, Book Review, Classic, serial reader

The Man in the Iron Mask

Review:

owlowlowl

Wow. This book is nothing like the movie, at least the one I watched with Leonardo DiCaprio and Jeremy Irons. The end was so tragic and the actual prisoner in the iron mask was such a small part of the story. Seems to me it was the complete opposite in the movie. Huh. Go figure.

 

I’m glad I finally read this.

Original post:
readingismyescape.booklikes.com/post/1651122/the-man-in-the-iron-mask

Posted in Adult, Book Review, Realistic Fiction

Truly Madly Guilty by Liane Moriarty

owlowlowl

This book was written by the same author as Big Little Lies, and it follows the same format. There is a big event that changes everything. The narrative jumps back and forth between the time before the event, the time after the event, and the night of the BBQ (the main event). Moriarty draws out the big reveal, just like she did in Big Little Lies. I will say I was anxious at first to find out what happened, and it made me spend more time reading just so I could find out. At one point I had an idea what happened, but I wasn’t completely right. My friend said this means I was wrong, but in truth, I was partially correct. But still wrong I guess. 😉

Bottom line, if you liked Big Little Lies, you will probably enjoy this one. It took a while to get to the point, but it was worth the wait.

Posted in Adult, Book Review, Classic, Sci-Fi

The Time Machine by H.G. Wells

owlowl

This is a classic that I never read and I always meant to, and it’s short so it didn’t take long at all. It was just okay for me. My favorite parts of the book were the beginning and the end, not so much the parts when the time traveler is actually in the future. But, it is amazing to think that Wells came up with the idea of a time machine and how so many movies, books, etc. went on to use and further expand on the idea. Wells was truly a visionary.

Posted in Adult, Adventure, Book Review, Classic, Serial Reader App

The Three Musketeers by Alexandre Dumas

owlowlowl

An adventurous tale of a hot-headed young man who finds true friends, faces violent enemies, falls for a few women, and escapes from danger many times, all while trying to realize his dream of becoming a musketeer like his father.

I found this to be an enjoyable read though a bit slow at times and while I was anxious to see how the action turned out, it was somewhat bogged down by the old language and lengthy descriptions.

Posted in Adult, Book Review, Graphic Novel, Young Adult

Maus by Art Spiegelman

owlowlowlowl

So, I started reading this book in June, ended up getting caught up in other things, including other readings, and I finally just finished it. I actually had to start again from the beginning, but it was worth it.

This graphic novel is written by Art Spiegelman and based on his father’s experiences before and during World War II. The book skips back and forth in time between the adult author speaking to his father and the years around World War II. In the illustrations, the Jewish people are represented by mice, the Germans cats, and the Polish people by pigs. This graphic novel is at times touching, at times horrifying, and at times just sad. A definite must-read for anyone interested in this time period.