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Better than Carrots or Sticks

Review:

Better Than Carrots or Sticks: Restorative Practices for Positive Classroom Management - Dominique Smith, Nancy Frey, Douglas Fisher

Audience: Adult

Format: Kindle/Owned

 

 

This book has some great material. I love the restorative practices for classroom management approach. The basic idea is to create a respectful classroom environment and teach students how to work through issues and resolve conflicts. Classrooms should be welcoming, constructive environments built on mutual respect and focused on encouraging student achievement.

 

The authors provide practical suggestions for how to implement the suggested practices and strategies. There is a lot of focus on building relationships: students to students & student to teacher.

 

This book is a must-read for any teacher – we must focus on developing compassion, relationship skills, and empathy in our students. We want them to learn more than just reading, writing & arithmetic (and tech skills). We want to help develop thoughtful, respectful, and intuitive adults.

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Carmela Full of Wishes

Review:

Carmela Full of Wishes - Matt de la Pena, Christian Robinson

Audience: Elementary

Format: Kindle/Owned

 

This picture book is too much for preschoolers and even kindergarteners. The themes of hope and perseverance are lost in a story that is hard for young children to follow or enjoy. The illustrations are well-done and the brother and sister’s faces are very expressive. I think this book is meant to promote diversity and understanding. Maybe it could be used with older elementary children. I just found it a bit boring.

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Review:

The Jumbies - Tracey Baptiste

Audience: Middle Grade

Format: Hardcover/Library Copy

 

Corinne La Mer’s heart beat like wild drums as she ran through the forest.

– first sentence

 

 

The Jumbies takes place on a Caribbean island and is based on Caribbean fairy tales. Everyone in the village avoids the forest, but Corinne doesn’t believe in the fairy tales about jumbies and she isn’t scared. Corinne’s mother died when she was four and she and her father have taken care of each other ever since. One day, a strange and beautiful woman appears in the market and again later at Corinne’s house. Her name is Severine and while Corinne’s father likes her, Corinne senses something is not quite right with Severine. Corinne and her friends will have to gather all of their courage and work together (despite their differences) to save her father and the island from Severine and the jumbies.
Before I started reading, I looked for some background on the book. First to check where the story takes place and then to find out what jumbies are. I found an article about the book that specified some of the types of jumbies: douens (small creatures that lure children into the forest), soucouyant (old ladies who shed their skin and suck your blood), and lagahoo (a kind of wolf-man). So, when I came upon these creatures in the story, I had some idea of what they were. But Baptiste does a fantastic job of describing them in the story so I would have understood even without the background knowledge. I did come across a word in italics, used several times: chups. It was used along with the phrase “sucked her teeth.” Even using text clues, I wasn’t sure exactly what it meant, so I Googled it. Chups means to suck one’s teeth in disgust or as a sign of disrespect. I’m glad I looked it up because it added another layer of meaning.
There are a lot of hints in the book about who Corrine’s mom was and how it pertains to Severine. I had an idea what the truth was, but I was also excited to watch Corrine discover the truth. Corrine is a strong, clever, brave girl and a great role model for young girls. In the article about the book, Baptiste talks about how much she loved fairy tales as a kid but how she never saw herself in the books. I think it’s fantastic that she wrote this book (and the series) so that young girls like her can see themselves in her books and relate to them.

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Christine

Review:

Christine (Audio) - Stephen King, Holter Graham

Audience: Adult

Format: Audiobook/Owned

 

This is the story of a lover’s triangle, I suppose you’d say — Arnie Cunningham, Leigh Cabot, and, of course, Christine.

– First sentence

 

What is there to say that hasn’t been said before? This is not one of my favorite King books, but the narrator is good and I did enjoy listening to Dennis’ point of view. As other reviewers have said, the middle of the book, which is narrated in the third person, is just not as good. 

 

I just watched the movie (again), and while it is campy and more than a bit dated, it might just be better overall than the book. 

 

 

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All 61 squares revealed: 1 through 18

Reblogged from: Moonlight Murder

All of the new squares (and scares) have been revealed, and I got these posts put together over the past few days, so I’m ready to reveal ALL OF THE SQUARES!

 

Buckle up, butter cup.

 

A note on book lists: where we have already got a working book list, I’ve linked to it. However, word of clarification: the rules have changed a bit in the last 3 years – so not every book on the booklists is necessarily a horror, supernatural, mystery or suspense book. If it shows up on a booklist it has been approved for game play on that space and is “grandfathered in” to eligibility.

 

The new categories don’t have a book list associated with them yet.

 

I am going to do this in three posts, because they are going to be very long! You’ve seen the 9 new squares:

 

  

 

1. Dark Academia: Any mystery, suspense, supernatural or horror that takes place at a school – high school, college, boarding school, etc.

2. Dystopian Hellscape: This is a multi-genre square! Any book that relates to the fictional depiction of a dystopian society, such as The Handmaid’s Tale or The Hunger Games, would qualify! 

3. International Woman of Mystery: This one is fairly obvious and is a twist on the “Terrifying Women” of years past – the only question is what does “international” mean? Basically, it means international to you – the reader. I’m in the U.S., so “international” means women mystery authors from Europe, South America, Asia, etc…

 

  

 

4. Psych: Psychological thrillers, plot twists and suspense, unreliable narrators and other mind-fuckery. And, as an aside, any Halloween Bingo book that takes place within or related to an insane asylum, haunted or otherwise, would qualify!

5. Truly Terrifying: Non-fiction that has elements of suspense, horror or mystery, including true crime, both contemporary and historical. Examples would be The Suspicions of Mr. Whicher by Kate Summerscale, In Cold Blood by Truman Capote, or The Amityville Horror by Jay Anson. If you have another idea, run it by me – just remember that it has to fit into the general Halloween Bingo criteria of mystery, suspense, horror or supernatural!

6. Paint It Black: Any book with a cover that is primarily black or has the word black in the title, was written by a black author, or relates to rock and roll music.

 

  

 

 

7. Stranger Things: this is a twist on the past 80’s Horror square with elements of the television show  – any horror that has supernatural elements, portal/parallel universes, government plots gone awry or is set or was written in the 1980’s. 

8. Film at 11:  The idea for this new space comes courtesy of Linda Hilton! Generally, in order to qualify for Halloween bingo, all books must fit into one of the general genres of horror, mystery, suspense or supernatural. This space is filled by any Halloween bingo book that has been adapted to film or television. For extra fun, you can watch the adaptation – although this is an optional add on!

9. King of Fear: You can read anything written by Stephen King or Joe Hill, or recommended by Stephen King (as long as the recommendation is otherwise eligible for Halloween Bingo). 

 

The “horror” squares:

 

  

 

10. Genre: Horror: Anything that qualifies as horror. Book list linked here.

11. Southern Gothic: horror set in the Southern part of the United States; Book list linked here

12. Modern Masters of Horror: horror published in or after 2000. Book list linked here. See horror booklist – notes identify sub-categories.

 

  

 

13. Fear Street: 1980’s and 1990’s vintage pulp-style series horror, targeted to teens, such as Point Horror, Fear Street and horror fiction that is written/published primarily for a YA or MG audience. Examples would include The Monstrumologist by Rick Yancey. Book list linked here

14. Terror in a Small Town: any horror book where the action primarily occurs in a small town or village. Examples would include: Something Wicked This Way Comes by Ray Bradbury, It by Stephen King. Book list linked here

15. Slasher Stories: books that share the tropes of classic slasher movies: teen characters, indestructible killers and/or multiple victims. Book list linked here

 

   

 

16. Classic Horror: horror fiction that was published prior to 1980; Book list linked here

17. American Horror Story: horror set in the United States. See horror booklist – notes identify sub-categories.

19. Stone Cold Horror: this is a late addition because I had too much YA horror, so I combined a couple of categories into Fear Street & needed something else for the horror genre! Horror that takes place primarily in a winter/cold/snow type setting. 

 

 

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Halloween Bingo Pre-Party: Book Suggestions for the New Squares

Reblogged from: Obsidian Blue

 

  

 

 

1. Dark Academia: Any mystery, suspense, supernatural or horror that takes place at a

school – high school, college, boarding school, etc.

 

Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone by JK Rowling

The Lightning Thief by Rick Riordan

Vampire Academy by Richelle Mead

Carry On by Rainbow Rowell

Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro

 

2. Dystopian Hellscape: This is a multi-genre square! Any book that relates to the fictional depiction of a dystopian society, such as The Handmaid’s Tale or The Hunger Games, would qualify! 

 

Parable of the Sower by Octavia E. Butler

1984 by George Orwell

The Road by Cormac McCarthy

V for Vendetta by Alan Moore

A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess

 

3. International Woman of Mystery: This one is fairly obvious and is a twist on the “Terrifying Women” of years past – the only question is what does “international” mean? Basically, it means international to you – the reader. I’m in the U.S., so “international” means women mystery authors from Europe, South America, Asia, etc…

 

Still Life by Louise Penny

The Crow Trap by Ann Cleeves

In the Woods by Tana French

The Chalk Man by CJ Tudor

Cover Her Face by PD James

 

   

 

4. Psych: Psychological thrillers, plot twists and suspense, unreliable narrators and other mind-fuckery. And, as an aside, any Halloween Bingo book that takes place within or related to an insane asylum, haunted or otherwise, would qualify!

The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins

Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn

The Murder of Roger Ackroyd by Agatha Christie

The Turn of the Screw by Henry James

Shutter Island by Dennis Lehane

 

5. Truly Terrifying: Non-fiction that has elements of suspense, horror or mystery, including true crime, both contemporary and historical. Examples would be The Suspicions of Mr. Whicher by Kate Summerscale, In Cold Blood by Truman Capote, or The Amityville Horror by Jay Anson. If you have another idea, run it by me – just remember that it has to fit into the general Halloween Bingo criteria of mystery, suspense, horror or supernatural!

 

The Stranger Beside Me by Ann Rule

Small Sacrifices by Ann Rule

Bitter Harvest by Ann Rule

The Five: The Untold Lives of the Women Killed by Jack the Ripper by Hallie Rubenhold 

The Devil in the White City 

 

6. Paint It Black: Any book with a cover that is primarily black or has the word black in the title, was written by a black author, or relates to rock and roll music.

 

The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins

The Ballad of Black Tom by Victor LaValle

Kindred by Octavia E. Butler

Dawn (Xenogenesis #1) by Octavia E. Butler

Dark Matter: Reading the Bones by Sheree Thomas (Editor)

 

  

 

 

7. Stranger Things: this is a twist on the past 80’s Horror square with elements of the television show  – any horror that has supernatural elements, portal/parallel universes, government plots gone awry or is set or was written in the 1980’s. 

 

14 by Peter Clines

The Drawing of the Three by Stephen King

The Mist by Stephen King

Watchers by Dean Koontz

Phantoms by Dean Koontz

 

8. Film at 11:  The idea for this new space comes courtesy of Linda Hilton! Generally, in order to qualify for Halloween bingo, all books must fit into one of the general genres of horror, mystery, suspense or supernatural. This space is filled by any Halloween bingo book that has been adapted to film or television. For extra fun, you can watch the adaptation – although this is an optional add on!

 

The Haunting of Hill House by Shirley Jackson (see Netflix series. Seriously though the show messed up the ending of the series, they had some great stuff like the Broken Neck Lady. Shudder).

The Mist by Stephen King (see movie. Seriously though the ending! The ending was a gut punch is went more King than King did!)

It by Stephen King (there’s now three movies (It was broken out into two movies for the latest go round). 

The Hellbound Heart by Clive Barker (otherwise known as Pinhead or the sexiest voice in horror movie land. Got to say that Hellraiser still holds up.

Books of Blood: Volume 1 by Clive Barker (you got to love The Midnight Meat Train movie. Probably the only time I could stand Bradley Cooper past 30 minutes in a movie that he is not playing a raccoon. 

The Ring by Kōji Suzuki (The Ring movies (American version). I still jump during the well scene. You know which one. 

 

Image result for pinhead gif

 

9. King of Fear: You can read anything written by Stephen King or Joe Hill, or recommended by Stephen King (as long as the recommendation is otherwise eligible for Halloween Bingo). 

 

Misery by Stephen King

Pet Sematary by Stephen King

Cujo by Stephen King

Needful Things by Stephen King

Revival by Stephen King

 

 

 

19. Stone Cold Horror: this is a late addition because I had too much YA horror, so I combined a couple of categories into Fear Street & needed something else for the horror genre! Horror that takes place primarily in a winter/cold/snow type setting. 

 

Let The Right One In by John Ajvide Lindqvist

White is for the Witching by Helen Oyeyemi

The Valancourt Book of Victorian Christmas Ghost Stories: Volume Two by Allen Grove

Dark Matter by Michelle Paver

The Hunger by Alma Katsu

 

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The Haunting of Hill House

Review:

The Haunting Of Hill House - Shirley Jackson, Bernadette Dunne

Audience: Adult

Format: Audiobook/Owned

 

No live organism can continue for long to exist sanely under conditions of absolute reality; even larks and katydids are supposed, by some, to dream. Hill House, not sane, stood by itself against its hills, holding darkness within; it had stood so for eighty years and might stand for eighty more.

– opening lines

 

This was an excellent performance by Bernadette Dunne. I enjoyed listening to her read the story and she made me feel like I was right there with the characters staying in Hill House. The book itself is well-written and had me up late wanting to see what would happen next. I felt for Eleanor, cheered for her when she stood up for herself and worried for her as she became more affected by Hill House.

 

I recently watched the Netflix series and loved it, but it seemed like it was more inspired by the book than following the plot at all.

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Bob by Wendy Mass & Rebecca Stead

Review:

Bob - Rob Dircks, Rebecca Stead, Wendy Mass, Nora Hunter

 

Audience: Grades 3-5

Formate: Audiobook/Library Copy

 

 

I feel bad that I can’t remember anything about Gran Nicholas’s house.

– first sentence

 

Livy is practically 11, well… 10 & 1/2 (almost). She hasn’t been to visit her Gran in Australia for five years. She has forgotten a lot of things: 1) A green stuffed elephant in overalls; 2) A net bag full of black chess pieces; 3) A clunky old tape recorder. But she also forgot something really, really important – Bob. 

 

Bob is a short, greenish creature dressed in a chicken suit. He’s been hiding in a closet, waiting five years for Livy to return. She promised him she would help him figure out who he is and find his way home.

 

Together Bob & Livy will try to solve the clues, figure out where Bob comes from, and discover unforgettable magic. The story is told through Bob & Livy’s points of view in alternating chapters. It’s the story of an unusual friendship that can overcome almost anything.

 

This is a great story and I loved both Livy and Bob. He remembers their early friendship and at first, is upset with her for forgetting. Eventually, we understand why she forgot and it makes perfect sense. Bob’s sense of humor is hysterical and a bit sarcastic – it’s great. And I wasn’t sure what Bob really was or where he belonged until the very end. Though there were clues, they were just beyond my frame of reference.

 

This is another great Sunshine State Award-nominated book, especially good for fans of magical realism, or talking “animals,” or even fans of friendship stories. I’ve seen this book in the library, but I wasn’t interested. I’m not sure why. I guess I thought it looked odd. I don’t know what I was thinking. That’s why they say, “never judge a book by its cover.” I’m very glad this book was nominated or I might never have read it.

 

I highly recommend this book!

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Homeroom Diaries

Review:

Homeroom Diaries - Lisa Papademetriou, James Patterson

Audience: Young Adult

Format: Hardcover/Owned

 

 

I’m starting over.

– First sentence

 

Margaret “Cuckoo” Clarke has just been released from a brief stay at a mental institution after she had an emotional breakdown. Now she’s starting over with “Operation Happiness.” Cuckoo and her friends (who call themselves the “Freakshow”) are determined to bring the different factions of high school together and find a way for everyone to get along.

 

The illustrated diary style works well for this book. Cuckoo writes down her thoughts and feelings about high school life, along with illustrations. She also talks to literary characters in an attempt to figure out life. I think this book will appeal to teens and pre-teens, especially those who like the diary format. It’s easy-to-read and tackles real-life situations. 

 

I read this for #3 School’s Out for Summer

At 272 pages, it’s worth  $3.00

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